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Matthews Hot Flags

Matthews Studio Equipment unveiled their new line of “Hot Flags” at this year’s NAB Convention in Las Vegas.  Engineered to withstand up to 1800 degrees Fahrenheit, Hot Flags can be placed directly in front of high wattage lights without fear of a burnout. Comparing the Hot Flag in a side by side test with the Matthews Metal Hi Temp Flag, each was positioned just inches from an ARRI 12K HMI.  A hole was burned through the metal flag inside of ten minutes while the Hot Flag showed no signs of damage for the duration of the test.  Allowing for safer on set workflow and more versatile lighting setups, Hot Flags are an innovative alternative to your everyday flag. Rent these great new flags along with a full selection of other grip gear from Moving Picture.  Available for shipping within the United States and abroad. Bookmark it to Stumbleupon, Digg, and more! Hide...

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The New ARRI ALEXA

ARRI’s newest digital camera, the ALEXA, is set to roll out this summer on a limited run.  Featured prominently at this year’s NAB Convention in Las Vegas, the ARRI ALEXA is already being touted as the next evolution in digital cinema. Utilizing their experience as industry leaders in film camera production, ARRI’s latest effort aims at maintaining this reputation on the digital front.  With an ARRI-made Super 35 format sensor, the ALEXA can shoot 1080P direct to the camera. SxS cards handle the onboard storage for the ALEXA, creating a seamless workflow from shooting to editing.  The ALEXA allows you to shoot full 1080P video, encoded down to the SxS cards in Final Cut Pro native codecs (ProRes 422 and ProRes 4444).  This means you can shoot a scene, pop the card into your computer and begin editing immediately without wasting a moment on conversion. Utilizing a Dual Gain Architecture (DGA) in its CMOS sensor, the ALEXA ensures the same wide exposure latitude across a range of sensitivity from EI 200 to EI 1600.  This generates low noise images with good detail in highlight and shadow areas.  Coupled with the versatility and dynamic range of 13.5 stops, the ALEXA captures a film-like aesthetic unlike any other digital camera. The ALEXA’s Exchangeable Lens Mount (ELM) system allows for the use of all 35mm PL mount lenses as well as Panavision, Canon or Nikon lenses.  Additionally, the ALEXA’s electronics system can easily be removed and replaced for future upgrades. With a great deal of buzz surrounding the ALEXA’s unique versatility and design, many are projecting that it will redefine the film industry’s expectations of competing gear such as the RED camera systems.  Designed for use across feature, television, commercial, documentary, and music video genres, the ALEXA will become available in late June, 2010.  Moving Picture plans on holding ALEXA training in the summer of 2010 in Miami, Florida.  Rent this revolutionary camera from Moving Picture this summer. Bookmark it to Stumbleupon, Digg, and more! Hide...

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Florida Film Festivals

A producer’s job doesn’t end with the wrap party.  Keeping a finger on the pulse of the film festival circuit is an essential part of the process.  With the number of active festivals growing all the time, this can become extremely overwhelming.  For that reason, we’ve created a list of all the upcoming Florida film festival deadlines.  Good luck! _________________________________________ Global Peace Film Festival Orlando, Florida September 21-26, 2010 Regular Deadline: Passed Late Deadline: May 21 _________________________________________ Central Florida Film Festival Ocoee, Florida September 3-6, 2010 Regular Deadline: Passed Late Deadline: June 14 _________________________________________ Freakshow Horror Film Festival Orlando, Florida October 8-10, 2010 Regular Deadline: May 14 Late Deadline: August 13 _________________________________________ 15 Minutes of Fame Film Festival Palm Bay, Florida July 9-10, 2010 Regular Deadline: Passed Late Deadline: May 15 _________________________________________ Jacksonville Film Festival Jacksonville, Florida October 13-17, 2010 Regular Deadline: May 31 Late Deadline: June 15 _________________________________________ Delray Beach Film Festival December 8-12, 2010 Earlybird Deadline: June 1 Regular Deadline: August 1 Late Deadline: October 15 _________________________________________ Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival October 22 – November 11, 2010 Earlybird Deadline: June 1 Regular Deadline: July 1 Late Deadline: August 1 _________________________________________ The Clearwater Film Festival September 29 – October 3, 2010 Regular Deadline: June 1 Late Deadline: August 1 _________________________________________ Independents’ Film Festival November, 2010 (Dates TBD) Regular Deadline: June 1 Late Deadline: N/A _________________________________________ Tampa International Gay & Lesbian Film Festival October 7-17, 2010 Regular Deadline: June 15 Late Deadline: August 1 _________________________________________ Miami Short Film Festival Miami, Florida November 13-20 Regular Deadline: Passed Late Deadline: June 30 Extended Deadline: August 30 _________________________________________ Naples International Film Festival November 4-7, 2010 Regular Deadline: July 1 Late Deadline: July 7 _________________________________________ Orlando Film Festival Orlando, Florida November 3-7, 2010 Earlybird Deadline: July 1 Regular Deadline: July 25 Late Deadline: August 2 Bookmark it to Stumbleupon, Digg, and more! Hide...

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Florida Film Incentives

  With budget cuts over the past five years, Florida film tax incentives have taken a hit.  After a reduction from $25 million available in 2007 down to $5 million in 2008 then up again to $10.8 million this year, visiting productions to the Sunshine State have varied in volume and become increasingly scarce.  As other states have pushed to get in on the $60 billion U.S. film industry, Florida now more than ever needs to reclaim its title as a film production heavyweight.    Florida’s Office of Film & Entertainment (Tallahassee, FL) promises films with a budget of $625,000 or more an expenditure-based rebate of 15–22%.  Independent Florida films must have a budget of $100,000 or more to receive a similar rebate of up to 17%.    These incentives fall short when compared to plans put into action by several other states.  Michigan pulled in Clint Eastwood’s “Gran Torino” and a whopping 27 additional features this year, versus luring just three Michigan-based films in 2007.  This is the result of a dramatic change in Michigan incentives that now provide tax refunds to the tune of 40% across the board on in-state expenditures and require a minimum budget of $50,000 to qualify.  While the Wolverine State has set a new bar for incentive plans, other states continue to draw Hollywood’s attention.  Louisiana, Massachusetts, and New Mexico have each launched massive incentive campaigns resulting in relative production increases within each state.  Equally, California has passed incentive plans that aim to maintain its status as an industry hub while reclaiming productions that have sought out greener pastures.    In most cases, tax based film incentives are directly related to the amount of production expenditures spent within each state.  If a given production doesn’t spend money in-state they can’t fully reap the benefits of corresponding tax breaks.  Accordingly, this develops a mutually beneficial relationship between the state and the production companies.   This direct interaction of giving productions tax breaks to stimulate in-state spending has trickle-down benefits to a vast range of businesses.  According to Michigan State University’s Center for Economic Analysis, Michigan communities benefited from more than $65 million in spending from film productions in 2008.     While much of Michigan’s effort is focused on building an infrastructure within the state, leading to an anticipated eventual reduction of their huge incentives, Florida has long maintained a strong infrastructure for film production.  According to a study by the University of West Florida’s Haas Center for Business Research, Florida’s film industry has an in-state economic impact of $29.3 billion.  Rental houses, postproduction facilities, professional studios, sound engineers, grips, gaffers, and camera operators continue to operate from Miami to...

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